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News and Updates from Kane County, Utah

Art of Rock Art Exhibit on Display at Kane County Hospital Opening Febuary 9, 2011
2/2/2011 : Arts & Culture

Art of Rock Art Exhibit on Display at Kane County Hospital Opening Febuary 9, 2011

The Ancient Painters of the Colorado Plateau rock art exhibit will be on display at the Kane County Hospital on February 9, 2011. The display is part of a traveling exhibit made possible by the Utah Division of Arts and Museums and is presented by the Kanab Arts Council, the Center for Education, Business, and the Arts (CEBA), Grand Staircase Escalante Partners, and the Kane County Hospital. A free community exhibit opening reception will be held on February 9, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at the hospital and at 6:00 p.m. a special rock art presentation will then be hosted across the street at the Kanab City Library by Matt Zweifel. Zweifel, is the lead Archeologist for the Bureau of Land Management Kanab Field Office and for the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. The presentation will focus on local Rock Art found on the Arizona Strip and the Grand Staircase in Kane County.

Southern Utah is blessed with natural wonders and inspirational landscapes, attracting millions of visitors each year to its dozen National Parks and Monuments. Less well-known but of equal world-class significance is Utah’s prehistoric rock art. This exhibition, Ancient Painters of  the Colorado Plateau, is a sample of Utah’s longest running style—the Barrier Canyon style.

Utah's first artists, Western Archaic hunters and gatherers (ca. 6,750 BCE–CE 400), created many of the most striking rock art panels. And while we do not know their name for themselves, we call their painting style the Barrier Canyon style.

Utah's collection of rock art styles rank among the best in the United States--in numbers, in time-depth, and in aesthetic quality. From a dozen apparent styles of Utah rock art, the Barrier Canyon style is generally recognized as the state's premier prehistoric form. The Barrier Canyon style is also one of the two major Archaic painted tock art styles in the United States (perhaps in the entire New World).

Even when considered on a global scale, the Barrier Canyon style is a remarkable body of visual images. Like the European animal painters of the caves, many Barrier Canyon image-makers were true painters and a few were exceptional artists. The range of their painting technique and their grasp of the visual ideas or issues attendant to painting are truly impressive, regardless of place or time.

The art project initiative was formed by David Sucec and Craig Law. Law, the exhibit photographer, is a distinguished regional documentary and fine art photographer and Professor of Art at Utah State University, Logan. Sucec is an independent artist and scholar living in Salt Lake City.

Matt Zweifel got his undergraduate degree from Oregon State University, with a Bachelor of Science in Anthropology and attended Graduate school at Washington State University, 1994, with a Masters Degree in Archaeology. He has worked as an archaeologist in Oregon, Washington, Montana, Idaho, California, Arizona, and Utah.  He moved to Utah from Montana following many years working for the Forest Service, with his wife who is also an Archaeologist, in 1997.  He also worked for about a year as the archaeologist for the Kaibab Band of the Southern Paiute, and then began working for the BLM. 

Refreshments will be provided and for more information contact CEBA Director, Kelly Stowell, at stowell@dixie.edu or phone number 435-899-0443. The rock art exhibit will be on display to the public at the hospital until March 8, 2011.

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